RestoreTime

The date and time that you want to restore your index to. You can use this option instead of listing a specific backup file to use to restore. When you use this option, IDOL Server:

You can use the following formats to specify your dates:

Date formats

Format Explanation
D+/M+/#YY+

A date. For example, 1/3/05, 23/12/1999, 10/07/40, or 8/5/2012.

If the year is a number less than 40, it is read as a year in the 2000s. If the year is a number between 40 and 99, it is read as a year in the 1900s. For example, 01/02/01 is read as 1 February 2001, and 01/03/40 is read as 1 March 1940.

IDOL Server treats the date as a date in its local timezone.

HH:NN:SS D+/M+/#YY+

A time and date. For example, 10:30:45 1/3/05, 18:55:00 23/12/99, 01:23:45 10/07/1940, or 07:15:00 8/5/2012.

If the year is a number less than 40, it is read as a year in the 2000s. If the year is a number between 40 and 99, it is read as a year in the 1900s. For example, 01/02/01 is read as 1 February 2001, and 01/03/40 is read as 1 March 1940.

IDOL Server treats the date as a date in its local timezone.

HH:NN:SS D+/M+/#YY+ #ADBC

A time and date with a time period. For example, 10:30:45 1/3/05 AD, 18:55:00 23/12/99 CE.

For the time period, you can use AD, CE, BC, BCE, or any predefined list of EPOCH indicators.

IDOL Server treats the date as a date in its local timezone.

N

A positive or negative number of days from the current date.

For example, –1 specifies yesterday's date, 0 specifies today's date, 1 specifies tomorrow's date, 2 specifies two days from now (the current date plus two), and so on.

Ns

A positive or negative number of seconds from now.

For example, –60s specifies one minute ago, –900s specifies 15 minutes ago, –3600s specifies one hour ago and so on. 60s specifies one minute from now, 900s specifies 15 minutes from now, 3600s specifies one hour from now, and so on.

Ne

Epoch seconds (seconds since 1 January 1970 UTC).

For example, 1012345000e specifies 22:56:40 on 29 January 2002 UTC.

NOTE:

IDOL Server treats any date that does not have explicit timezone information as a date in the local timezone, both in the index and in your query parameters. This behavior might result in non-intuitive matches.

For example, epoch second values are always UTC. The value 1012345000e matches times as 22:56:40 on 29 January 2002 UTC. If your local timezone is GMT-6, this query might match an indexed date value of 03:56:40 on 29 January 2002 (which corresponds to the same time UTC), because the indexed date is in your local timezone.

Similarly, if your query date is 03:56:40 29/01/2002, this might match an indexed epoch seconds date of 1012345000.

NOTE:

If you use a format that contains a space (such as a date and time), you must percent-encode the parameter value.

IDOL Server processes date and time values according to the timezone of the server. To avoid confusion or inconsistent results, HPE recommends that you use the epoch seconds format where possible. The GetBackupData action returns the available backup times in epoch seconds, and the IndexerGetStatus action returns the times for index jobs in epoch seconds if you set EpochTime to True, so that you can find the time that you want to restore to.

Actions: DREINITIAL
Type: String
Default:  
Example: RestoreTime=1461685026e
See Also:  

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